PAMS- Physician Assistant

PAMS 6101 Physician Assistant Profession

This course is an overview of the major healthcare systems and medical industry in the United States to include the physician assistant (PA) profession and the role of PAs in the health care field. This course includes instruction in the PA profession, historical development, and current trends.  Students will receive instruction in PA professional issues, physician-PA team relationships, political issues that affect PA practice, and PA professional organization.  This course includes many aspects of being a successful student as well as practitioner.  Students will be taught a variety of study skills along with receiving instruction on intellectual honesty and appropriate academic and professional conduct.  Students will be taught how to use common medical databases to access medical literature.  Students will receive instruction in quality health care with special consideration of the impact of racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic health disparities on health care delivery.  Students will receive instruction in the different health beliefs, values and expectations of patients and other health care professionals that can affect communication, decision-making, compliance, and health outcomes. The concepts of public health as they relate to the role of the practicing PA including an appreciation of the public health system and the role of health care providers participating in disease surveillance, reporting, and intervention are delivered in this course.  In addition to the PA practice, students will receive instruction in the roles and responsibilities of various health care professionals, emphasizing the team approach to patient centered care beyond the traditional physician-PA team approach.  Medical ethics, PA licensure, credentialing, laws and regulations regarding professional practice, patient safety, quality improvement, prevention of medical errors, and risk management are introduced topics in this course.

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B1.01, B1.05, B1.08, B2.10, B2.11, B2.12, B2.13, B2.14, B2.16, B2.17

1

PAMS 6115 Laboratory Medicine and Diagnostic Studies I

This course will provide an overview of commonly utilized diagnostic tools, including laboratory studies, minor procedures, and radiologic procedures based on current professional practices. Students will learn the appropriate application and interpretation of diagnostic tests related to infectious diseases, dermatology, hematology, cardiology, and pulmonology.  Electrocardiograph utilization, application, and interpretation will be taught in this section.  Students will be instructed in problem solving and medical decision-making skills in conjunction with the Clinical Disease and Prevention Course PAMS 6530.

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B1.01, B1.07, B2.05, B2.07

 

1

PAMS 6116 Laboratory Medicine and Diagnostic Studies II

This course is a continuation of Laboratory Medicine and Diagnostic Studies I. This course continues to provide an overview of commonly utilized diagnostic tools, including laboratory studies, minor procedures, and radiologic procedures based on current professional practices. Students will learn the appropriate application and interpretation of diagnostic tests related to gastroenterology, nutrition, genitourinary, nephrology, rheumatology, orthopedics, and neurology.  Students will be instructed in problem solving and medical decision-making skills in conjunction with the Clinical Disease and Prevention Course PAMS 6630.

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B1.01, B1.07, B2.05, B2.07

1

PAMS 6117 Laboratory Medicine and Diagnostic Studies III

This course is a continuation of Laboratory Medicine and Diagnostic Studies II.  This course continues to provide an overview of commonly utilized diagnostic tools, including laboratory studies, minor procedures, and radiologic procedures based on current professional practices. Students will learn the appropriate application and interpretation of diagnostic tests related to otolaryngology, ophthalmology, endocrinology, women’s health, pediatrics, emergency medicine, and surgery. Students will be instructed in problem solving and medical decision-making skills in conjunction with the Clinical Disease and Prevention Course PAMS 6930.

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B1.01, B1.07, B2.05, B2.07


1

PAMS 6150 Clinical Prep

This is a one-week preparatory session prior to students beginning clinical rotations.  Students will review preceptor expectations, professionalism, intellectual honesty, and appropriate academic and professional conduct. This course will provide instruction regarding reimbursement, coding and billing, and documentation of care with a focus on electronic medical records. Basic clinical and surgical skills will be covered in this course.   Patient safety, quality improvement, prevention of medical errors, risk management, and quality assurance will be also be addressed.

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B1.05, B2.13, B2.15

1

PAMS 6160 Humanities, Ethics, Altruism, Leadership (HEAL) I

HEAL I is an extended course comprised of on-campus seminars that occur throughout the clinical components of the program’s curriculum.  This course reinforces the knowledge of important medical practitioner attributes including humanities, ethics, altruism, and leadership.  Students will learn about the principles and practice of intellectual honesty, academic and professional conduct, medical ethics, medical law, cultural competency, diversity, spirituality, patient centered care, medical team practice, and preparing students to work collaboratively in interprofessional patient centered teams. Interprofessional patient centered team instruction will emphasize the importance of the team approach to patient centered care beyond the traditional physician-PA team approach.  It assists students in learning the principles of interprofessional practice and include opportunities for students to apply these principles in interprofessional teams.  This course provides additional instruction on the constantly changing health care system and the impact of racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic health disparities on health care delivery.  Instruction related to medical care and diversity aims to prepare students to evaluate their own values and avoid stereotyping.  It assists them in becoming aware of differing health beliefs, values and expectations of patients and other health care professionals that can affect communication, decision-making, compliance and health outcomes.  This course also provides instruction and assessment in the development of problem solving, medical decision-making skills, patient evaluation, diagnosis, and management related to individualized patient care (across the lifespan to provide preventive, emergent, acute, chronic, rehabilitative, palliative, and end-of life care).  It includes content relevant to prenatal, infant, children, adolescent, adult, and elderly populations.  Students will receive instruction and training in their progression from active student to practicing Physician Assistant.  Topics include, but not limited to: interviewing skills, resume workshops, PA licensing and credentialing, PANCE preparation, PA professional organizations, and skills to become community and national PA leaders. 

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B1.06, B1.07, B1.08, B2.05, B2.06, B2.14, B2.16, B2.17

1

PAMS 6161 Humanities, Ethics, Altruism, Leadership II

This is a continuation of the HEAL I course comprised of on-campus seminars that occur throughout the clinical components of the program’s curriculum.  This course continues to reinforce the knowledge of important medical practitioner attributes including humanities, ethics, altruism, and leadership.  Students will learn about the principles and practice of intellectual honesty, academic and professional conduct, medical ethics, medical law, cultural competency, diversity, spirituality, patient centered care, medical team practice, and preparing students to work collaboratively in interprofessional patient centered teams. Interprofessional patient centered team instruction will emphasize the importance of the team approach to patient centered care beyond the traditional physician-PA team approach.  It assists students in learning the principles of interprofessional practice and include opportunities for students to apply these principles in interprofessional teams.  This course provides additional instruction on the constantly changing health care system and the impact of racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic health disparities on health care delivery.  Instruction related to medical care and diversity aims to prepare students to evaluate their own values and avoid stereotyping.  It assists them in becoming aware of differing health beliefs, values and expectations of patients and other health care professionals that can affect communication, decision-making, compliance and health outcomes.  This course also provides instruction and assessment in the development of problem solving, medical decision-making skills, patient evaluation, diagnosis, and management related to individualized patient care (across the lifespan to provide preventive, emergent, acute, chronic, rehabilitative, palliative, and end-of life care).  It includes content relevant to prenatal, infant, children, adolescent, adult, and elderly populations.  Students will receive instruction and training in their progression from active student to practicing Physician Assistant.  Topics include, but not limited to: interviewing skills, resume workshops, PA licensing and credentialing, PANCE preparation, PA professional organizations, and skills to become community and national PA leaders. 

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B1.06, B1.07, B1.08, B2.05, B2.06, B2.14, B2.16, B2.17

1

PAMS 6165 Humanities, Ethics, Altruism, Leadership III

This is a continuation of the HEAL II course comprised of on-campus seminars that occur throughout the clinical components of the program’s curriculum.  This course continues to reinforce the knowledge of important medical practitioner attributes including humanities, ethics, altruism, and leadership.  Students will learn about the principles and practice of intellectual honesty, academic and professional conduct, medical ethics, medical law, cultural competency, diversity, spirituality, patient centered care, medical team practice, and preparing students to work collaboratively in interprofessional patient centered teams. Interprofessional patient centered team instruction will emphasize the importance of the team approach to patient centered care beyond the traditional physician-PA team approach.  It assists students in learning the principles of interprofessional practice and include opportunities for students to apply these principles in interprofessional teams.  This course provides additional instruction on the constantly changing health care system and the impact of racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic health disparities on health care delivery.  Instruction related to medical care and diversity aims to prepare students to evaluate their own values and avoid stereotyping.  It assists them in becoming aware of differing health beliefs, values and expectations of patients and other health care professionals that can affect communication, decision-making, compliance and health outcomes.  This course also provides instruction and assessment in the development of problem solving, medical decision-making skills, patient evaluation, diagnosis, and management related to individualized patient care (across the lifespan to provide preventive, emergent, acute, chronic, rehabilitative, palliative, and end-of life care).  It includes content relevant to prenatal, infant, children, adolescent, adult, and elderly populations.  Students will receive instruction and training in their progression from active student to practicing Physician Assistant.  Topics include, but not limited to: interviewing skills, resume workshops, PA licensing and credentialing, PANCE preparation, PA professional organizations, and skills to become community and national PA leaders. 

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B1.06, B1.07, B1.08, B2.05, B2.06, B2.14, B2.16, B2.17

1

PAMS 6166 Humanities, Ethics, Altruism, Leadership IV

This is a continuation of the HEAL III course comprised of on-campus seminars that occur throughout the clinical components of the program’s curriculum.  This course continues to reinforce the knowledge of important medical practitioner attributes including humanities, ethics, altruism, and leadership.  Students will learn about the principles and practice of intellectual honesty, academic and professional conduct, medical ethics, medical law, cultural competency, diversity, spirituality, patient centered care, medical team practice, and preparing students to work collaboratively in interprofessional patient centered teams. Interprofessional patient centered team instruction will emphasize the importance of the team approach to patient centered care beyond the traditional physician-PA team approach.  It assists students in learning the principles of interprofessional practice and include opportunities for students to apply these principles in interprofessional teams.  This course provides additional instruction on the constantly changing health care system and the impact of racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic health disparities on health care delivery.  Instruction related to medical care and diversity aims to prepare students to evaluate their own values and avoid stereotyping.  It assists them in becoming aware of differing health beliefs, values and expectations of patients and other health care professionals that can affect communication, decision-making, compliance and health outcomes.  This course also provides instruction and assessment in the development of problem solving, medical decision-making skills, patient evaluation, diagnosis, and management related to individualized patient care (across the lifespan to provide preventive, emergent, acute, chronic, rehabilitative, palliative, and end-of life care) .  It includes content relevant to prenatal, infant, children, adolescent, adult, and elderly populations.  Students will receive instruction and training in their progression from active student to practicing Physician Assistant.  Topics include, but not limited to: interviewing skills, resume workshops, PA licensing and credentialing, PANCE preparation, PA professional organizations, and skills to become community and national PA leaders. 

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B1.06, B1.07, B1.08, B2.05, B2.06, B2.14, B2.16, B2.17

1

PAMS 6170 Evidence Based Medicine and Research (EBMR) I

Evidence Based Medicine and Research I course is an extended course comprised of on-campus seminars that occur throughout the clinical components of the program’s curriculum.  This course will provide instruction to prepare students to search, interpret and evaluate the medical literature with the application to individualized patient care.  Specifically, this course will assist students in maintaining a critical, current and operational knowledge of new medical findings required for the prevention and treatment of disease.  Instruction for the following topics are included in this course: framing of research questions, sampling methods, interpretation of basic biostatistical methods, and the limits of medical research.  The use of common medical databases to access medical literature is also included in this course. 

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B2.10

1

PAMS 6171 Evidence Based Medicine and Research II

Evidence Based Medicine and Research II is a continuation of the EBMR I course that is an extended course comprised of on-campus seminars that occur throughout the clinical components of the program’s curriculum.  This course continues to provide instruction to prepare students to search, interpret and evaluate the medical literature with the application to individualized patient care.  Specifically, this course will assist students in maintaining a critical, current and operational knowledge of new medical findings required for the prevention and treatment of disease.  Instruction for the following topics are included in this course: framing of research questions, sampling methods, interpretation of basic biostatistical methods, and the limits of medical research.  The use of common medical databases to access medical literature is also included in this course. 

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B2.10

1

PAMS 6175 Applied Research I

Applied Research I is an extended course comprised of on-campus seminars that occur throughout the clinical components of the program’s curriculum.  This course provides students the opportunity to conduct research.  Students will search, interpret, and evaluate medical literature to develop a research project individualized to patient care.  Instruction for this course will guide students to develop a research question, determine a research study design, and collect data.  Students will utilize statistical methods to appraise the data obtained and determine best application of their results for the improvement of patient care. 

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B2.10

1

PAMS 6176 Applied Research II

Applied Research II is a continuation of the Applied Research I course.  It is an extended course comprised of on-campus seminars that occur throughout the clinical components of the program’s curriculum.  This course continues to provide students the opportunity to conduct research.  Students will search, interpret, and evaluate medical literature to develop a research project individualized to patient care.  Instruction for this course will guide students to develop a research question, determine a research study design, and collect data.  Students will utilize statistical methods to appraise the data obtained and determine best application of their results for the improvement of patient care. 

 

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B2.10

1

PAMS 6195 Graduation Preparation

This is a preparatory course prior to graduation.  During this course, students are exposed to multiple resources for preparation of graduation and post-graduation employment. This course will review instruction about Physician Assistant licensure, credentialing, and laws/regulations regarding professional practice.  This course will also consist of a summative evaluation requirement for each student prior to graduation.  The summative evaluation correlates with the didactic and clinical components of the program’s curriculum and will measure each student’s knowledge, interpersonal skills, patient care skills, and professionalism required to enter clinical practice. 

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B2.14, C3.04

1

PAMS 6201 Basic Fundamentals of Medical Science

The Basic Fundamentals of Medical Science course is designed to provide the first-year physician assistant student with a baseline level of established and evolving biomedical science knowledge in which to build upon during the study of health and human diseases. This course includes instruction in the following areas of applied medical sciences and their application in clinical practice:  biochemistry, immunology, microbiology, infectious diseases, genetics, and molecular mechanisms of health and disease.

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B1.02, B2.02e

2

PAMS 6210 Pharmacotherapeutics I

This course is a study of the applied medical sciences of pharmacology and pharmacotherapeutics and their application in clinical practice.  Students will be taught the appropriate selection and rational use of drugs for the prevention and treatment of diseases.  This course will include instruction in the acute and longitudinal management of infectious, dermatologic, hematologic, cardiac, and pulmonary diseases to include the emergent, acute, chronic, rehabilitative, palliative, and end-of-life patient care situations. Students will be instructed in problem solving and medical decision-making skills while developing patient centered pharmacologic management plans for prenatal, infant, children, adolescent, adult, and elderly populations.  Students will be instructed on the delivery of patient education and the counseling of patients about medication adherence. This course follows along with the Clinical Disease and Prevention Course PAMS 6530.

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B1.07, B2.02d, B2.03, B2.05, B2.06, B2.09

 

2

PAMS 6211 Pharmacotherapeutics II

This course is a continuation of Pharmacotherapeutics I as the curriculum progresses through the body/organ systems.  This course is a study of the applied medical sciences of pharmacology and pharmacotherapeutics and their application in clinical practice.  Students will be taught the appropriate selection and rational use of drugs for the prevention and treatment of diseases.  This course will include instruction in the acute and longitudinal management of gastroenterology, genitourinary, nephrology, rheumatology, orthopedics, and neurology diseases to include the emergent, acute, chronic, rehabilitative, palliative, and end-of-life patient care situations. Students will be instructed in problem solving and medical decision-making skills while developing patient centered pharmacologic management plans for prenatal, infant, children, adolescent, adult, and elderly populations.  Students will be instructed on the delivery of patient education and the counseling of patients about medication adherence. This course follows along with the Clinical Disease and Prevention Course PAMS 6630.

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B1.07, B2.02d, B2.03, B2.05, B2.06, B2.09

 

2

PAMS 6212 Pharmacotherapeutics III

This course is a continuation of Pharmacotherapeutics II as the curriculum progresses through the body/organ systems.  This course is a study of the applied medical sciences of pharmacology and pharmacotherapeutics and their application in clinical practice.  Students will be taught the appropriate selection and rational use of drugs for the prevention and treatment of diseases.  This course will include instruction in the acute and longitudinal management of otolaryngology, ophthalmology, endocrinology, women’s health, pediatrics, mental health, geriatrics, palliative care, emergency medicine, and surgery diseases to include the emergent, acute, chronic, rehabilitative, palliative, and end-of-life patient care situations. Students will be instructed in problem solving and medical decision-making skills while developing patient centered pharmacologic management plans for prenatal, infant, children, adolescent, adult, and elderly populations.  Students will be instructed on the delivery of patient education and the counseling of patients about medication adherence, drug abuse, misuse, and treatments. This course follows along with the Clinical Disease and Prevention Course PAMS 6930.

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B1.07, B2.02d, B2.03, B2.05, B2.06, B2.09

2

PAMS 6220 Human Physiology I

This course comprises the basic concepts and principles that are essential in comprehending the fundamental mechanisms of human physiology at the cellular, tissue, and organ levels. This course will focus on basic human physiology concepts to include: cellular, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and nutrition physiologies.

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B1.01, B1.02, B2.02

2

PAMS 6221 Human Physiology II

This course is a continuation of Human Physiology I and comprises the basic concepts and principles that are essential in comprehending the fundamental mechanisms of human physiology at the cellular, tissue, and organ levels. This course will focus on basic human physiology concepts to include: renal, genitourinary, musculoskeletal, neurologic, reproductive, and endocrine physiologies. 

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B1.01, B1.02, B2.02

2

PAMS 6240 Mental Health

This course is designed to provide the students with an overview of normal and abnormal characteristics of human psychological development and behavior.  This social and behavioral science course includes detection and treatment of substance abuse; human sexuality; issues of death, dying and loss; response to illness, injury, and stress; principles of violence identification and prevention; and psychiatric/behavioral conditions.  The course will provide skills needed for clinical evaluation and assessment of children, adolescent, adult, and elderly populations with psychiatric/behavioral conditions and disorders. Instruction in this course will prepare students to provide preventative, emergent, acute, chronic, rehabilitative, palliative, and end-of-life care for patients with psychiatric disorders.  This course will include instruction in interpersonal and communication skills that result in the effective exchange of information and collaboration with patients diagnosed with psychiatric disorder(s), their families, and other health professionals. 

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B2.04, B2.06, B2.08

2

PAMS 6250 Clinical Skills

This course is designed to introduce the physician assistant student to common clinical skills and procedures following current professional practices.  The course will include the fundamental and technical skills needed to perform in-office or bedside procedures.  Certification for Basic Life Support (BLS) and Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS) will occur during this course. 

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B2.07

2

PAMS 6320 Human Anatomy I

This course is designed to develop an understanding of normal human anatomy with an in-depth examination of anatomical structures and functions.  Emphasis is placed on the relationship of normal structures and normal variants with clinical correlation to pathology and disease processes. Human structural features are taught through demonstration, dissection, cross section, radiographs, MRI and CT scans, and ultrasonography.   Lectures are complemented by laboratory study of real dissection, prosected cadavers, anatomical models, and 3D anatomic software.  A regional approach will be used to study the integument, trunk, head, neck, nervous system, and extremities. 

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B1.01, B1.02, B2.02

3

PAMS 6321 Human Anatomy II

This course is a continuation of Human Anatomy I and is designed to develop an understanding of normal human anatomy with an in-depth examination of anatomical structures and functions.  Emphasis is placed on the relationship of normal structures and normal variants with clinical correlation to pathology and disease processes. Human structural features are taught through demonstration, dissection, cross section, radiographs, MRI and CT scans, and ultrasonography.   Lectures are complemented by laboratory study of real dissection, prosected cadavers, anatomical models, and 3D anatomic software.  A regional approach will be used to study the musculoskeletal, head, neck, spine, genitourinary, reproductive, and neuroanatomy.

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B1.01, B1.02, B2.02

3

PAMS 6325 Patient Assessment and Counseling I

This course teaches the fundamentals of medical history-taking, physical examination, and patient counseling across the lifespan including infant, children, adolescent, adult, and elderly populations. Physical examination of the patient is approached using a systematic model. Primary skills include performing complete and focused physical examinations, recognizing normal and abnormal findings, developing a diagnostic and treatment plan, counseling patients, medical documentation, and professional conduct. This course content builds a foundation for the development of the clinical reasoning skills and problem solving necessary to formulate differential diagnoses. The use of common medical databases to access medical literature is also included. Students will develop the ability to search, interpret, apply, and cite evidence from medical literature into their medical management plans and patient education. Instruction in counseling in patient education skills is patient centered, culturally sensitive, and focused on helping patients cope with illness, injury, and stress, adhere to prescribed treatment plans, and modify their behaviors to more healthful patterns. This course also teaches the knowledge and skills required to provide medical care to patients from culturally diverse populations. Instruction related to medical care and diversity prepares students to evaluate their own values and avoid stereotyping.  It assists them in becoming aware of differing health beliefs, values, and expectations of patients and other health care professionals that can affect communication, decision-making, compliance, and health outcomes.  This section of the course will focus on patient communication, counseling, determining patient vital signs, and physical examination of the integument, cardiac, and pulmonary systems. Patient presentations, simulations, standardized patients, case studies, role-play, and electronic medical record completion are additional components of this course.

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B1.01, B1.05, B1.06, B1.07, B2.04, B2.05, B2.06, B2.09, B2.10


3

PAMS 6326 Patient Assessment and Counseling II

This course is a continuation of Patient Assessment and Counseling I.  This course continues to teach the fundamentals of medical history-taking, physical examination, and patient counseling across the lifespan including infant, children, adolescent, adult, and elderly populations. Physical examination of the patient is approached using a systematic model. Primary skills include performing complete and focused physical examinations, recognizing normal and abnormal findings, developing a diagnostic and treatment plan, counseling patients, medical documentation, and professional conduct. This course content builds a foundation for the development of the clinical reasoning skills and problem solving necessary to formulate differential diagnoses. The use of common medical databases to access medical literature is also included. Students will develop the ability to search, interpret, apply, and cite evidence from medical literature into their medical management plans and patient education. Instruction in counseling in patient education skills is patient centered, culturally sensitive, and focused on helping patients cope with illness, injury, and stress, adhere to prescribed treatment plans, and modify their behaviors to more healthful patterns. This course also teaches the knowledge and skills required to provide medical care to patients from culturally diverse populations. Instruction related to medical care and diversity prepares students to evaluate their own values and avoid stereotyping.  It assists them in becoming aware of differing health beliefs, values, and expectations of patients and other health care professionals that can affect communication, decision-making, compliance, and health outcomes.  This section of the course will focus on medical history-taking, physical examination, and patient counseling to include the following systems: gastroenterology/nutrition, genitourinary, nephrology, rheumatology, musculoskeletal, and neurology. Patient presentations, simulations, standardized patients, case studies, role-play, and electronic medical record completion are additional components of this course. 

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B1.01, B1.05, B1.06, B1.07, B2.04, B2.05, B2.06, B2.09, B2.10

3

PAMS 6327 Patient Assessment and Counseling III

This course is a continuation of Patient Assessment and Counseling II.  This course continues to teach the fundamentals of medical history-taking, physical examination, and patient counseling across the lifespan including infant, children, adolescent, adult, and elderly populations. Physical examination of the patient is approached using a systematic model. Primary skills include performing complete and focused physical examinations, recognizing normal and abnormal findings, developing a diagnostic and treatment plan, counseling patients, medical documentation, and professional conduct. This course content builds a foundation for the development of the clinical reasoning skills and problem solving necessary to formulate differential diagnoses. The use of common medical databases to access medical literature is also included. Students will develop the ability to search, interpret, apply, and cite evidence from medical literature into their medical management plans and patient education. Instruction in counseling in patient education skills is patient centered, culturally sensitive, and focused on helping patients cope with illness, injury, and stress, adhere to prescribed treatment plans, and modify their behaviors to more healthful patterns. This course also teaches the knowledge and skills required to provide medical care to patients from culturally diverse populations. Instruction related to medical care and diversity prepares students to evaluate their own values and avoid stereotyping.  It assists them in becoming aware of differing health beliefs, values, and expectations of patients and other health care professionals that can affect communication, decision-making, compliance, and health outcomes.  This section of the course will focus on medical history-taking, physical examination, and patient counseling to include: oral health, otolaryngology, ophthalmology, endocrinology, pediatrics, women’s health, emergency medicine, surgical disease, and palliative care. Patient presentations, simulations, standardized patients, case studies, role-play, and electronic medical record completion are additional components of this course. 

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B1.01, B1.05, B1.06, B1.07, B2.04, B2.05, B2.06, B2.09, B2.10

3

PAMS 6530 Clinical Disease & Prevention I

This course follows an organ system-based delivery of instruction in patient evaluation, diagnosis, and management of clinical diseases and disorders covering all organ systems.  Emphasis will be placed on instruction in the pathophysiology of diseases common to the organ system.  Students will be taught to recognize the patient history, physical signs, and symptoms of diseases in order to generate a differential diagnosis, ordering and interpreting diagnostic studies, and diagnosis.  Students will be instructed in problem solving and medical decision-making skills while developing acute and longitudinal management plans for adolescent, adult, and elderly populations. Management plans will be taught to be inclusive addressing medical issues, patient education, and referrals when needed.  Students will receive instruction in delivering patient centered, culturally sensitive patient information focused on helping patients cope with illness, injury, and stress.  Additional instruction will be given on behavior modification, life style medicine, and prevention.  This course will provide opportunities for students to apply the principles of interprofessional teams in the medical management of shared patients.  This semester will focus on infectious, dermatologic, hematologic, cardiac, and pulmonary diseases to include preventive, acute, chronic, and rehabilitative patient care.

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B1.07, B1.08, B2.02c, B2.03, B2.05, B2.06, B2.09

5

PAMS 6550 Internal Medicine In-Patient

This core clinical rotation provides students with exposure to the principles and practice of inpatient internal medicine. This supervised clinical practice experience enables students to assess patients seeking medical care across the life span with an emphasis on caring for the acutely and chronically ill adult and elderly patient in the inpatient setting.  Students will assist in the evaluation and treatment of hospital patients, participate in patient rounds and presentations, and learn how to function as part of the internal medicine and interprofessional medical teams.  This supervised clinical practice experience will enable students to achieve the learning outcomes needed to attain the competencies in the management of acute, emergent, chronic conditions, and implement preventive care strategies.  This clinical experience will enable the student to provide care as an entry level physician assistant upon graduation.

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B3.02, B3.03a, B3.04c

5

PAMS 6551 Internal Medicine Out-Patient

This core clinical rotation provides students with exposure to the principles and practice of internal medicine.  This supervised clinical practice experience enables students to assess patients seeking medical care across the life span with an emphasis on caring for the acutely and chronically ill adult and elderly patients in an outpatient medical setting. Students will assist in the evaluation and treatment of patients, participate in patient rounds and presentations, and learn how to function as part of the internal medicine and interprofessional medical teams. This clinical rotation experience will enable students to achieve the learning outcomes needed to attain the competencies in the management of acute, emergent, chronic conditions and implement preventive care strategies.  This clinical experience will enable the student to provide care as an entry level physician assistant upon graduation. 

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B3.02, B3.03a, B3.04a

5

PAMS 6552 Obstetrics and Gynecology

This core clinical rotation provides students with exposure to the principles and practice of women’s health, obstetrics, and gynecology.  This core rotation provides students with experience in managing common women’s health prevention and diseases in both the inpatient and outpatient medical settings.  This clinical rotation enables students to assess adolescent, adult, and elderly female patients seeking medical care with an emphasis on menarche, family planning, childbearing, peri-menopause, menopause and post-menopause.  Prevention, recognition, and treatment of prenatal, gynecologic care, sexually transmitted diseases, cancers, will be addressed.  Students will gain exposure to labor and deliver, surgical aspects of gynecology, as well as function as a part of the interprofessional healthcare team.  This clinical experience will enable students to achieve the learning outcomes needed to attain the competencies in the management of acute, emergent, chronic conditions, and implement preventive care strategies.  This clinical rotation will enable the student to provide care as an entry level physician assistant upon graduation. 

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B3.02, B3.03 a and b, B3.04 a and c

5

PAMS 6553 Pediatrics

This core clinical rotation provides students with exposure to the principles and practice of pediatric medicine.  This supervised clinical practice experience enables students to assess neonates, infants, children, and adolescent patients seeking medical care in the pediatric outpatient medical setting.  This rotation is intended to provide the opportunity to refine techniques of history-taking and physical examination specific to the pediatric population.   In addition to providing students with an experience in parental education, parental guidance, and milestone recognition, this rotation aims to expose students to illnesses and injuries that are unique to the pediatric patient.  Students will learn how to function as part of a pediatric interprofessional team. This clinical practice experience will enable students to achieve the learning outcomes needed to attain the competencies in the management of acute, emergent, chronic conditions, and implement preventive care strategies.  This clinical experience will enable the student to provide care as an entry level physician assistant upon graduation.  

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B3.02, B3.03 a, B3.04c

5

PAMS 6554 Emergency Medicine

This core clinical rotation provides students with exposure to the principles and practice of emergency medicine.  This supervised clinical practice experience enables students to assess patients seeking medical care (in the emergency department) across the life span with an emphasis on caring for the acutely and chronically ill infant, child, adolescent, adult, and elderly patient.  Students will gain exposure to the triage, evaluation, and management of patients in the emergent medical setting.  Emphasis is on students assessing patient acuity, disease state, and appropriate management within the confines of the emergency medicine department.  Students are expected to participate as a member of an interprofessional team in the assessment and care of major and minor medical emergencies. This clinical rotation will also enable students to achieve the learning outcomes needed to attain the competencies in the management of acute, emergent, chronic conditions, and implement preventive care strategies.  This clinical experience will enable the student to provide care as an entry level physician assistant upon graduation.    

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B3.02, B3.03 a, B3.04b

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PAMS 6555 Surgery

This core clinical rotation provides students with exposure to the principles and practice of surgery.  This supervised clinical practice experience enables students to assess patients seeking medical care across the life span with an emphasis on caring for infants, children, adolescents, adults, and elderly patients with surgically manageable diseases in the operating room and outpatient setting.  Emphasis of learning is on the pre-operative evaluation and preparation of the patients for surgery; assisting during the intra-operative period; and the post-operative care of surgical wounds, recovery, and possible complications.  Students will learn how to participate as a member of an interprofessional surgical team. This clinical rotation experience will enable students to achieve the learning outcomes needed to attain the competencies in the management of acute, emergent, chronic conditions and implement preventive care strategies.  This clinical experience will enable the student to provide care as an entry level physician assistant upon graduation. 

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B3.02, B3.03 a and c, B3.04 a and d

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PAMS 6556 Behavioral and Mental Health

This core clinical rotation provides students with exposure to the principles and practice of behavioral and mental health.  This supervised clinical practice experience enables students to assess patients seeking medical care across the life span with an emphasis on caring for the child, adolescent, adult and elderly patient with a psychiatric illness, behavioral or mental health disorder. Emphasis will be placed on the development of communication and behavior modification skills.  Students will also develop an increased understanding of the social, economic and psychological factors related to the patient and family members of a patient with a mental illness. Students will learn how to participate as a member of an interprofessional mental healthcare team.  This clinical rotation experience will enable students to achieve the learning outcomes needed to attain the competencies in the management of acute, emergent, chronic conditions and implement preventive care strategies.  This clinical experience will also enable the student to provide care as an entry level physician assistant upon graduation. 

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B3.02, B3.03 a and d, B3.04

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PAMS 6575 Family Medicine

This advanced clinical rotation provides students with exposure to the principles and practice of family medicine.  This supervised clinical practice experience enables students to assess patients seeking medical care across the life span with an emphasis on caring for the acutely and chronically ill infant, child, adolescent, adult, and elderly patients in an outpatient medical setting. Students will develop the skills necessary to evaluate, monitor, and manage health problems encountered in family medicine.  Emphasis is on disease prevention and health maintenance.  Students will develop an increased understanding of social, economic and environmental factors related to family medicine. Students will learn how to engage as a member of an interprofessional family medicine team. This advanced rotation experience will also enable students to achieve the learning outcomes needed to attain the competencies in the management of acute, emergent, chronic conditions and implement preventive care strategies.  This clinical experience will enable the student to provide care as an entry level physician assistant upon graduation. 

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B3.02, B3.03a, B3.04a

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PAMS 6591 Advanced Core Rotation: Elective

These advanced core rotations provides students with opportunities to gain additional experience in one of the core disciplines or to supplement the foundational core rotations with specialty medical or surgical experiences.

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PAMS 6630 Clinical Disease & Prevention II

This course is a continuation of the Clinical Disease and Prevention I course.  This course continues to follow an organ system-based delivery of instruction in patient evaluation, diagnosis, and management of clinical diseases and disorders covering all organ systems.  Emphasis will be placed on instruction in the pathophysiology of diseases common to the organ system.  Students will be taught to recognize the patient history, physical signs, and symptoms of diseases in order to generate a differential diagnosis, ordering and interpreting diagnostic studies, and diagnosis.  Students will be instructed in problem solving and medical decision-making skills while developing acute and longitudinal management plans for adolescent, adult, and elderly populations. Management plans will be taught to be inclusive addressing medical issues, patient education, and referrals when needed.  Students will receive instruction in delivering patient centered, culturally sensitive patient information focused on helping patients cope with illness, injury, and stress.  Additional instruction will be given on behavior modification, life style medicine, and prevention.  This course will provide opportunities for students to apply the principles of interprofessional teams in the medical management of shared patients.  This semester will focus on gastroenterology, nutrition, genitourinary, nephrology, rheumatology, musculoskeletal, and neurology diseases and disorders to include preventive, acute, chronic, and rehabilitative patient care.

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B1.07, B1.08, B2.02c, B2.03, B2.05, B2.06, B2.09

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PAMS 6930 Clinical Disease & Prevention III

This course is a continuation of the Clinical Disease and Prevention II course.  This course continues to follow an organ system-based delivery of instruction in patient evaluation, diagnosis, and management of clinical diseases and disorders covering all organ systems.  Emphasis will be placed on instruction in the pathophysiology of diseases common to the organ system.  Students will be taught to recognize the patient history, physical signs, and symptoms of diseases in order to generate a differential diagnosis, ordering and interpreting diagnostic studies, and diagnosis.  Students will be instructed in problem solving and medical decision-making skills while developing acute and longitudinal management plans for prenatal, infant, children, adolescent, adult, and elderly populations. Management plans will be taught to be inclusive addressing medical issues, patient education, and referrals when needed.  Students will receive instruction in delivering patient centered, culturally sensitive patient information focused on helping patients cope with illness, injury, and stress.  Additional instruction will be given on behavior modification, life style medicine, and prevention.  This course provides additional opportunities for students to apply the principles of interprofessional teams in the medical management of shared patients.  This semester will focus on otolaryngology, ophthalmology, oral health, endocrinology, women’s health, pediatrics, emergency medicine, surgical disease, and geriatrics associated diseases and disorders to include preventive, emergent, acute, chronic, rehabilitative, palliative, and end-of-life patient care.

ARC-PA Standards, 4th Ed.: B1.07, B1.08, B2.02c, B2.03, B2.05, B2.06, B2.09

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